Brush and floss for breast health

Brush and floss for breast health

Did you know that women who have periodontal (gum) disease are 14% more likely to develop breast cancer? This new research finding further reinforces the connection between oral and overall health. To help lower your risk of gum disease or treat existing gum disease, remember to brush your teeth for two minutes twice per day, floss daily and visit the dentist regularly. You can learn more about the connection between breast cancer and gum disease from Breastcancer.org: http://bit.ly/2e2xoCU

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Hygiene tips for Breast Cancer Patients

Hygiene tips for Breast Cancer Patients

October isn't just National Dental Hygiene Month— it's also Breast Cancer Awareness Month. You may be wondering how breast cancer is related to oral health. Periodontal (gum) disease puts you at a higher risk of developing breast cancer, and breast cancer treatment can cause dental issues such as bleeding and inflamed gums, decay and dry mouth. Don't forget to notify us of changes in your health history such as cancer treatment. We'll work with you and your other healthcare providers as a team.

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Commit to forming healthy habits

Commit to forming healthy habits

October is National Dental Hygiene Month, and we want to encourage all of our patients to form healthy hygiene habits. Research has found that it takes an average of 66 days to form a habit. Join us this month in committing to healthy habits such as brushing for two minutes twice per day and flossing daily!

What helpful reminders do you use to remember to practice healthy habits?

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The best way to protect your teeth while playing sports

The best way to protect your teeth while playing sports

Mouthguards help prevent damage to your teeth and protect you from concussions while physically active. If you or your child are going to be playing sports this fall, we can help fit for the proper mouthguard. If you already have one, here are some great care tips to extend the life of your mouthguard:
* Brush with a toothbrush and toothpaste or at least rinse before and after every use.
* Periodically wash in cool, soapy water and rinse thoroughly.
* Store and carry in a protective container that has openings for ventilation.
* Never put your mouthguard in hot water or in direct sunlight.
* Inspect regularly for wear and tear and replace when necessary.

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Are baby teeth important?

Are baby teeth important?

You may have wondered if primary (baby) teeth are important since they are eventually replaced by permanent (adult) teeth. The answer is yes! Primary teeth don't just help children eat, speak and smile— they help them maintain good overall health, good nutrition, maintain space for permanent teeth and build confidence. Learn more about primary teeth from Head Start: http://bit.ly/1Bg5L2F

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hat is baby bottle tooth decay?

hat is baby bottle tooth decay?

Have you ever heard of baby bottle tooth decay? This type of tooth decay can occur in young children who drink from baby bottles if their teeth are exposed to sugary drinks for prolonged periods of time, such as when bottles are used as pacifiers or when they are put to sleep with bottles. Learn more about how to prevent baby bottle tooth decay here: http://bit.ly/V7y27o

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Keep your cool

Keep your cool

Are you nervous about visiting the dentist? There are a few things you can do to help alleviate dental anxiety:
* Discuss your anxiety with our team so that we can best care for you.
* Establish a signal to give our team if you need a break.
* Ask us about sedation options to help you relax.

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Health benefits of chewing gum

Health benefits of chewing gum

Did you know that chewing gum has benefits beyond simply freshening your breath? The act of chewing increases saliva flow, washes away food debris and neutralizes acids in the mouth. For maximum health benefits, look for sugarless gum with the ADA seal of approval!

 

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Enjoy citrus responsibly

Enjoy citrus responsibly

You hear a lot about how sour candy is bad for your teeth, but what about naturally sour foods like citrus fruits? Sour taste is caused by acid, which can actually irritate your tongue and erode tooth enamel, making your teeth more susceptible to decay. Enjoy citrus in moderation and rinse your mouth with water afterward.

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